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Dressing the part plays a role in success in family court

When you have a court date or hearing with a judge, it's important that you present yourself appropriately even if you don't expect an argument or difficulties that day. The way you present yourself makes a difference in all aspects of your life, even in a family court setting.

No judge is going to blame you for not wanting to wear a new suit with a bottle-fed baby in tow, but the reality is that appearances are the first thing on which people judge you. If you come to court in baggy, torn clothing, the judge may think you are less capable of caring for your child than an ex-spouse wearing a pristine suit.

Bias is an inherent part of the justice system

Bias should not be part of the justice system, but the fact of the matter is that judges are people. Humans all judge each other by looking at what we wear and how we act. Your appearance in court is the first thing others will notice, so you want to make sure yours leaves a good impression.

What should you avoid wearing to court?

There are some items that are "no-no's" in court. These include flip-flops, torn jeans, jeans of any kind (in most cases), tank tops, pajamas, open-toed shoes and yoga pants. Of course, anything too tight or revealing also needs to be put away for another day.

When you appear in court, it's time to look your best. If you can't decide what to wear, opt for a suit or blouse and slacks. This is the time to pull out your best business attire.

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